Category: Msft

So I am working on a Go speech today, and I got to a slide where I wanted to mention the C# programming language. Or more importantly, I wanted to mention how some internal teams at Microsoft are switching over from C# to Go!

The only problem with this slide is that I am supposed to be somewhat credible in what I say..

and I have never written a line of C# in my life.

Furthermore I run linux as my primary operating system. So of course I decided it would be a good idea to try to get a C# development environment up and and running on Archlinux. After a total of 10 seconds of searching Google I couldn’t find the step-by-step tutorial I wanted so naturally I am creating one.

So here goes…

 

Install VS Code

C# isn’t scary at all!

Download page for Linux

Tarball for Linux

Okay so you don’t need VS code, but the C# plugin is really legit. It feels like any other programming language!

But feel free to use any text editor you like. We are just going to be banging out a quick and dirty hello world.

If you plan on writing copious amounts of C# I strongly suggest you get VS code. It’s free and works fantastically on Linux.

Install Mono

(Seriously this is all you do)


sudo pacman -S mono

Write your hello world program

Create a new file called HelloWorld.cs anywhere on your file system.

HelloWorld.cs

// A Hello World! program in C#.
using System;
namespace HelloWorld
{
    class Hello 
    {
        static void Main() 
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello World!");

            // Keep the console window open in debug mode.
            Console.WriteLine("Press any key to exit.");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

Thanks to the official Microsoft docs for the code snippet!

Compile

The mono mcs compiler works very similar to gcc and accepts an -out flag to specify the name of the executable.


mcs -out:helloexe HelloWorld.cs

Run

Then you can run your program!


mono hello.exe

What’s next?

I am going to do some benchmarking with C# and Go and explore some concurrency patterns between the two. Stay tuned for my findings!

Hey everyone!

So a huge thanks to Hashiconf for letting me come out and talk about this stuff in person! But for those of you who missed it, or want more information there is also this blog on the matter as well.

So this is just a quick technical follow up of the tool terraformctl that I used in my session to get Terraform up and running inside of Kubernetes as a controller!

What is terraformctl?

A command line tool and gRPC server that is pronounced Terraform Cuddle.

 

The GitHub repo can be found here!

 

It’s a philosophical example of how infrastructure engineers might start looking at running cloud native applications to manage infrastructure. The idea behind the tool is to introduce this new way of thinking, and not necessarily to be the concrete implementation you are working for. This idea is new, and therefore a lot of tooling is till being crafted. This is just a quick and dirty example of what it might look like.

Terraformctl follows a simple client/server pattern.

We use gRPC to define the protocol in which the client will communicate with the server.

The server is a program written in Golang that will handle incoming gRPC requests concurrently while running a control loop.

The incoming requests are cached to a mutex controlled shared point in memory.

The control loop reads from the shared memory.

Voila. Concurrent microservices in Go!

What is cloud native infrastructure?

Well it’s this crazy idea that we should start looking at managing cloud native infrastructure in the same way we manage traditional cloud native applications.

If we treat infrastructure as software then we have no reason to run the software in legacy or traditional ways when we can truly concur our software by running it in a cloud native way. I love this idea so much that I helped author a book on the subject! Feel free to check it out here!

The bottom line is that the new way of looking at the stack is to start thinking of the layers that were traditionally managed in other ways as layers that are now managed by discreet and happy applications. These applications can be ran in containers, and orchestrated in the same ways that all other applications can. So why not do that? YOLO.

What Terraformctl is not..

Terraformctl is not (and will never be) production ready.

It’s a demo tool, and it’s hacky. If you really want to expand on my work feel free to ping me, or just out right fork it. I don’t have time to maintain yet another open source project unfortunately.

Terraformctl is not designed to replace any enterprise solutions, it’s just a thought experiment. Solving these problems is extremely hard, so I just want more people to understand what is really going into these tools.

Furthermore there are a number of features not yet implemented in the code base, that the code base was structure for. Who knows, maybe one day I will get around to coding them. We will see.

If you really, really, really want to talk more about this project. Please email me at kris@nivenly.com.

 

 

So as I continue to find workarounds and fixes for running Archlinux on my Microsoft Surface Book I will post them..

Here is a great quick and dirty fix for the wifi issue.

Problem

After closing your Surface Pro, or sending your computer into a state of hibernation or suspension the WiFi agent quits working.

Solution

Found a handy dandy script that totally fixes the problem.


sudo wget -P /usr/lib/systemd/system-sleep nivenly.com/surface-hib.sh

 

 

So I joined a new team at Microsoft and we run Microsoft Teams for our primary form of communication.

So here is a quick walk through of getting it up and running on Archlinux.

Archlinux

Download the pacman package from Github

cd ~

wget https://github.com/ivelkov/teams-for-linux/releases/download/v0.0.4/teams-for-linux-0.0.4.pacman

Install with Pacman


sudo pacman -U teams-for-linux-0.0.4.pacman

Alias teams to run in the background


echo "alias teams='teams &>/dev/null &'" >> ~/.bashrc

source ~/.bashrc

 

Then you can run teams from the command line to launch the program. Happy Microsofting. J